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Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

1 edition of Pocket manual for the dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres. found in the catalog.

Pocket manual for the dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres.

Pocket manual for the dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres.

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  • 32 Currently reading

Published by I.G.Farberindustrie Aktiengesellschaft in Hoechst am Main .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14122244M

Abstract. Polypropylene (PP) fibers having a nonpolar paraffinic character are generally undyeable by the classical bath-dyeing method and therefore the substantial part of the PP fiber production is colored with pigments (mass dyed fibers).Cited by: 5.   Mercerised cotton takes dyes so fast, that chemicals are added in the dye bath to check the process in order that the dyes may not enter so rapidly as to render the shading uneven. Woven fabric Knitted Taking a cotton blend, and then mercerising will produce an effect called as crepon effect.

International Textile Dyeing HERMAN P. BAUMANN. Ch.E. of Chemists J. M. FLETCHER du de Company part BA Edition I. Full text of "Cotton manufacture: a manual of practical instruction in the processes of opening, carding, combing, drawing, doubling, and spinning of cotton, and the methods of dyeing and preparing goods for the market" See other formats.

Save the solution for the next dyeing procedure. Mordant Dyeing Measure g of tannic acid. Dissolve the tannic acid in ml of distilled or deionized water in a mL beaker. Heat the solution to boiling and place a strip of cotton and multifiber fabric in the solution. Allow the cloth strips to remain in the hot solution for 1 to 2 minutes. t is pre-mordant dyeing. Dyeing property of Carmine, gardenia yellow and sodium copper chlorophyll on cotton fabrics which were pre-treated by metal mordant (FeSO4AlCl3 and ZnCl2) was studied. The reasonable pre-treatment was determined by comparing the color depth (K/S value) of dyed samples. And then, the dyed samples were treated with no-iron finishing resin Author: Xia Zhu, Qing Tao Meng.


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Pocket manual for the dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres Download PDF EPUB FB2

The dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres with the dyestuffs of Leopold Cassella & Co. () The dyeing of cotton fabrics - a practical handbook for the dyer and student - F.

Beech () The dyeing of leather with the dyestuffs of Cassella Color Company ()Seller Rating: % positive. Filed under: Dyes and dyeing -- Cotton. La teinture du coton / par E. Serre. (Paris: H. Dunod et E. Pinat, ), by E. Serre (page images at HathiTrust; US access only) Los colores de anilina de la Badische Anilin- & Soda-Fabrik, Ludwigshafen s/Rhin y su aplicación sobre lana, algodón, seda y otras fibras textiles.

Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family fiber is almost pure natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds.

The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the. Excellent choice for a first time book on dyeing. Covers every aspect of the topic in very easy to read terms.

Set out by colour, the book shows the effect of certain vegetable dyes on different fabrics with different mordants. The reader is able to pick and chose what effects he wants, the put together a recipe from the different s: 6.

The dyeing of cotton and other vegetable fibres with the dyestuffs of Leopold Cassella & Co. () The dyeing of cotton fabrics - a practical handbook for the dyer and student - F.

Beech () The dyeing of leather with the dyestuffs of Cassella Color Company (). The study of the theory of dyeing then becomes a study of the sets of relations between the fibres and water, on the one hand, as sol- vents, and the dye-stuffs and mordants, on the other hand, as the substances dissolved, and this comes within the strict province of physical chemistry and the theory of : t Matthews.

Dyeing Organic Cotton with Natural Vegetable Dyes Instructions are for dyeing ½ pound of organic cotton fabric, yarn or fiber. Before dyeing, the fabric needs to be prepared. First, wash the fabric. Don’t dry it though – it needs to be wet.

Then prepare the fixative or “mordant.” This is to help the fabric take up. In this paper, the natural dyes are extracted and fabric dyeing is analyzed by applying dye on % pure cotton. At first stage we extract dye from. Dyeing of cotton with reactive dye 1.

Presentation on: Dyeing of Cotton with Reactive Dye Prepared By: Tanvir Ahammed Rana Id. 19th Batch, Textile Department. SouthEast University. Introduction Reactive dyes are probably the most popular class of dyes to produce 'fast dyeing' on piece goods. Cotton: This vegetable natural fibres comes from a substance surrounding cotton plant seeds.

Cotton fiber is the first used fiber all around the world The chemical structure is constituted by 85% of pure cellulose. natural and man-made fibres available today, offers a wide selection to be used in clothing. Globally natural fibres contribute about 48% to the fibre basket with 38% from cotton, 8% from bast and allied fibres and 2% from wool and silk fibres.

Man's desire, to produce perfect fabrics resulted in the production of blended Size: KB. Natural Dyeing Method #2 – Solar Dyeing. Solar Dyeing is a really cool method for dying at home.

It’s a gentler way although you will need plenty of patience for this method. Solar dyeing is very simple and once your dye bath is set up there is nothing further for you to do but wait. Purchase Handbook of Textile Fibres - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNDyeing Method for Cotton and other Cellulosics.

Exhaust Application. Application of Azonine and Durantine Dyes to Cellulosic fibre. Azonine dyes are an economical range of direct dyes with good colour values for users where specific fastness properties are not the prime requirement.

Durantine dyes may be used to dye most cellulosic fibres and its blend by exhaust, continuous. Dyeing of cotton, wool and silk with extract of Allium cepa Article (PDF Available) in Pigment and Resin Technology 38(4) July with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Fiber Dyeing. Stock dyeing, top dyeing, and tow dyeing dyeing are used to dye fibers at various stages of the manufacturing process prior to the fibers being spun into yarns. The names refer to the stage at which the fiber is when it is dyed. All three are included under the broad category of.

The Coal Tar Colours of Meister Lucius & Bruning Ltd. and Their Application in Dyeing Cotton and Other Vegetable Fibres.

Manchester: Bradford: London: Glasgow: Meister Lucius & Bruning Ltd., pp. x 20 cm. 10 Figures, and hundreds of small, dyed, textile samples mounted in columns on most pages, all present.

Decorative endpapers. The complete guide to Natural Dyeing is a very comprehensive guide to techniques and includes 'recipes' for dyeing fibre and fabric.

Despite containing all the information one could possibly need this is no dry 'how too' manual, it is absolutely dripping with gorgeous images/5(10). The book is in two volumes. Volume I deals with the natural fibres on which we depended for our textiles until comparatively recent times.

Volume II is concerned with man-made fibres, including rayons and other natural polymer fibres, and the true synthetic fibres which have made such rapid progress in s: 1. A guide to dyeing yarn, fleece, prepared fiber, silk scarves and painted warps.

Directions are given for mixing dye, immersion dyeing, and applying the dye directly to the fiber. There are many variations listed plus a variety of processing methods/5. To be successful at natural dyeing you need to know a bit about mordants and fixatives.

Basically, natural dyes will not adhere to natural fibres without the use of a mordant or fixative. Whilst you may initially get a beautiful result from the dyeing, it will soon wash out or fade away! Protein fibres like silk and wool absolutely need a plant.Cotton remains the most miraculous fiber under the sun, even after 8, years.

No other fiber comes close to duplicating all of the desirable characteristics combined in cotton. The fiber of a thousand faces and almost as many uses, cotton is noted for its versatility, appearance, performance and above all, its natural comfort.

Handbook of Textile Fibres book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This book offers a comprehensive survey of the man-made fibers, /5(10).